Job Search: How to Reach Anyone You Want

Job Search: How to Reach Anyone You Want

“The quality of your life is the quality of your communication.” Tony Robbins   What would you consider the most important factor for success when seeking a new job? A great resume? Relevant qualifications that match the job description? An MBA or other educational achievements? Actually, in my 12 years of coaching career seekers I have found that the most important factor for job search success and overall career advancement is the quality of your communication. And, fundamentally, the first step in quality communications is engaging people who have the authority to hire you for the job(s) you desire. The challenge you face is that the current hiring system is designed to insulate job seekers from the decision makers. Online job postings are the most extreme example. Many require that you blindly complete an application and provide various additional information, not knowing if any human will actually see your information. This is a source of great frustration, which is understandable. In contrast to online applications and other ineffective activities, you know that your best bet is to cut out the “middle men” (recruiters, resume screeners, etc.) and connect directly with decision makers who have the authority to hire you. As a career coach for the last 12+ years, I have seen just about every possible method for making connections. After doing the research and identifying companies of interest, here are my recommendations for improving your odds of reaching people who can hire you. Job Search Actions for Connecting with Hiring Managers – Take the time to research your companies of interest and identify the specific person or people who would most likely be your boss. Various online tools are available, most notably LinkedIn. These are your...
Interviewing 101: “Tell Me about Yourself”

Interviewing 101: “Tell Me about Yourself”

One of the most dreaded requests job seekers struggle with while networking and during job interviewing is “Tell me about yourself.” As my recruiter friend Skip Freeman noted in one of his blog posts, a poor response to this request in a job interview can have dire consequences. Skip said: “Blow the answer and you risk irrevocably and immediately branding yourself as just another “run of the mill” candidate and ending up blowing  the entire job interview. Nail the answer and… well… good things certainly can follow!” A great response indicates you are thoughtful, prepared, and well organized in your thinking. These are attributes all employers want. This article offers an alternative formula for creating such a response, often described as an elevator speech. I have used this formula with hundreds of clients I have coached and their feedback indicates that it works! A formula for job interview success Your response needs to encapsulate your thoughtful personal branding in an attractive and compelling fashion. As outlined in the job interviewing chapter in Fast Track Your Job Search (and Career!), I  recommend keeping your responses under 60 seconds during job interviews and networking conversations. Here is a simple five point chronological (which makes it easier to remember) elevator speech formula that you can use the next time you encounter a “Tell me about yourself” request. Five Point Chronological Elevator Speech Formula – for Interviews and Networking: To start, tell them something personal about your origins, family, etc. prior to completing your education. This adds human interest, which I think is important (more on this in another article). Assuming your education is adequate for jobs you are pursuing, next mention your most notable educational achievements/degrees. Next, describe your...

New Year’s Resolution: Quit My Job

On average, proactive job hoppers make more money and gain more career satisfaction. Loyal employees tend to be less valued than outside unknowns. Since the majority of people are unsatisfied in their jobs, the odds are that YOU should have a new year’s resolution like “Get a new job.” This article is intended to get you headed down a constructive path toward future happiness and career satisfaction. The best time to look for a job is when you are employed and doing well in your current role. The next best time to look for a job is when you are employed and not doing well. Consider the classic examples of two people who recently contacted me……… Last week, a Group President for a Fortune500 was referred to me because he has a new CEO boss and senses that things may be changing for the worse. This president anticipates that the management direction will not be a good fit for him and he is motivated to get started on a highly confidential job search. The week before last, a B2B salesperson at a small employer was referred to me because he had taken a commission-only job a few months earlier and saw no opportunity to earn what he needs to support his family. It was evident to the salesman that he was in the wrong job and hence he wants to jump ship ASAP. It’s a new year and you have lots of options. Tens of thousands of people are changing jobs every day. If you find yourself in any of the following job situations, I want to encourage you...