Synchronize Your LinkedIn Profile for a Better Career

Synchronize Your LinkedIn Profile for a Better Career

I spoke with a job seeker this week who is seven months into his search. After receiving his inquiry and before calling him, I did what many professionals and all recruiters do these days…. I reviewed his LinkedIn profile. What I saw was that he had eight jobs in the last 11 years. Yikes! When we got on the phone, I told him that I had reviewed his LinkedIn profile. He shared his background, which I had already seen (and was frightened by) on his LinkedIn profile. I asked what he wanted to do next and he told me he wanted to be in sales or business development with a technology company. After a few more minutes of conversation, I decided to “hit him” with a question that I hoped would get his attention and be helpful to him. (I do this frequently when I see people shooting themselves in both feet.) I asked him “Do you realize your LinkedIn profile is scary?” He said he recognized that his frequent job changes were not good, so he had just updated his resume to lump some of the work together under a title like “consulting” or something similar. Your LinkedIn Profile and Your Resume So, my next question was “Why didn’t you do the same thing on your LinkedIn profile?” He said he hadn’t gotten around to it yet, but planned to do it soon. Remember… this is seven months into his job search! I tell you this story because I want you to avoid making the same mistake this job seeker made… using a scary resume and LinkedIn profile, plus not synchronizing them. In addition...
Creating a Killer Resume, Part 5

Creating a Killer Resume, Part 5

Would you like a resume that helps you advance your career by appealing to recruiters and hiring managers?  As an executive career coach who sees hundreds and writes many resumes each month, I can tell you that 90% of the resumes out there are ineffective. Could yours be part of the 90%?  In this series of posts, I want to help ensure you to have a top 10% resume that is optimized for HUMAN readers. First a short review: Part 1- 15 Second Resume Skim Test In Part 1, we reviewed the importance of your resume passing the “15-Second Skim Test” and examined ideas to help you avoid being instantly rejected by recruiters and others. Part 2 – Resume Walk-Through In Part 2, we began the process of walking through the typical professional or executive resume from top to bottom and discussed the first page header and (optional) objective. Part 3 – Resume Informational Groups In Part 3, we discussed various information groupings that people locate in advance of their work history, such as those labeled Summary, Objective, Profile, or Qualifications. Part 4 – Work History Improvements In Part 4, we considered improvements for your reverse chronological work history. Today – Part 5 Part 5 – Educational Accomplishments In this, Part 5, let’s look at the section that concludes most professional and executive resumes… the one that identifies your educational accomplishments (and possibly some additional related information). The Education Section of Your Resume Let’s start by considering where the education section should be located within your resume. If you have a college degree and little or no paid work experience, it is customary to...
Creating a Killer Resume, Part 4

Creating a Killer Resume, Part 4

Would you like a resume that helps you advance your career by appealing to hiring managers and recruiters who review your resume?  As an executive career coach who sees hundreds and writes many resumes each month, I can tell you that fewer than 10% of the resumes out there are effective. I want you to be in the top 10%. This series of posts discuss resumes for HUMAN readers, not those “optimized” for online applications and inhuman resume screening software. First a Short Review: Part 1 – the 15-second resume skim test In Part 1, we reviewed the importance of your resume passing the “15-Second Skim Test” and examined ideas to help you avoid being instantly rejected by recruiters and others. Part 2 – the resume walk-through In Part 2, we began the process of walking through the typical professional or executive resume from top to bottom and discussed the first page header and (optional) objective. Part 3 – resume information groups In Part 3, we discussed various information groupings on your resume that people locate in advance of their work history, such as those labeled Summary, Objective, Profile, or Qualifications. In this, Part 4, we need to consider what you choose to include in your reverse chronological work history. For resumes being read by humans, this is the “meat”. This is where you must provide well organized information that sells your value to whatever depth the reader desires. Today -Part 4:  Work History Resume Section Organization of Work History Information It is conventional and preferred that you group your work history by employer and list the employers in reverse chronological order. If you have had contract...
Creating a Killer Resume, Part 3

Creating a Killer Resume, Part 3

Resume Writing Series Review Creating a Killer Resume Part 1 In Part 1 we discussed the importance of your resume passing the “15-Second Skim Test” and I shared suggestions to avoid being instantly rejected by recruiters and other humans. Creating a Killer Resume Part 2 In Part 2 we began the process of walking through the typical professional resume or executive resume from top to bottom and discussed the header and (optional) objective sections. Creating a Killer Resume Part 3  In this post, let’s look at the area of the resume that comes next… before we get to the work history section. This is one of the most non-standard and chaotic areas produced by both professional resume writers and amateur writers …. Human or non-human resume reader? In resume writing, an important question you must ask yourself at this point in the composition of your resume is whether you are writing your resume for a human resume reader or a machine resume screener (ATS screening software). If you are writing for a machine and trying to win a “battle of resumes” for a posted job (yuck!), then many of the options that follow will work as long as your content is relevant to the job posting. My comments that follow assume you are writing for a human reader. Please keep this in mind. Resume Sections Here are a variety of informational groupings (sections) I have seen – preceding the reverse chronological work history of a resume: The summary/objective/profile section I recommend you omit this section … because most people won’t read it. If you feel compelled to include it, you will do...
Creating a Killer Resume, Part 2

Creating a Killer Resume, Part 2

Resume Writing Series Review Creating a Killer Resume Part 1 We discussed the importance of your resume passing the “15-Second Skim Test” and I shared suggestions to avoid being instantly rejected by recruiters and other humans. Creating a Killer Resume, Part 2 Resume Upgrade Having a full-time career coaching business for 12+ years, I have reviewed thousands of resumes and rewritten hundreds of professional and executive resumes. I believe I have seen all of the typical resume writing shortcomings. In this series of articles, I want to help you upgrade your resume to get better career and job search results. Resume Header Resume header section appears at the top of the first page. It typically contains the candidate name and contact information. Resume Header Contents Here is a list of typical resume header contents and a recommendation for each: Your name – Provide your name as you prefer to be addressed, such as Will Smith rather than C. William Smith. Use a font 4 to 6 points larger than the font of the body. Your mailing address – Unless there are extenuating reasons, omit this. Everything you need will come via email, and your location can be used to screen you out. Your email address – This is a must have. If you are currently employed, assume your email can be read by your employer and use a personal address. Don’t use @aol.com as this dates you. Your phone number(s) – A cell number is best. Leave all others off, unless there are extenuating reasons to include them. Your LinkedIn profile hyperlink – If you have a common name...

Creating a Killer Resume, Part 1

How can you upgrade your resume and get better results in your career and future job searches? Resume effectiveness  is what this series of articles is all about! Having a full-time career coaching business for 12+ years, I have reviewed thousands of resumes and rewritten hundreds of professional and executive resumes. I believe I have seen all of their typical shortcomings and want to share how to upgrade your resume. An upgraded resume can accelerate your career results and improve your future job search strategies. A key point for resume writers As I mention in Chapter 6 of Fast Track Your Job Search (and Career!),  …  “do not write your résumé in a manner that is most pleasing to you. It is important that you write your résumé in a manner that will be most pleasing to the people who will be reading your résumé.” Can your resume pass the “15 second skim test”? A good place to start in upgrading your resume is to consider what I term the “15 second skim test”. When you submit your resume for a published job, recruiters and other reviewers can be faced with 200 or more submissions. This drives reviewers to set a fast pace that typically gives each resume 10-15 seconds on their first pass, after which they decide if yours should be trashed or set aside for further analysis. For this reason, it is important that you compose your resume in a manner that maximizes your odds of passing this first phase of review. Three steps to a better resume Here is a two-part exercise that can help: 1.  The Timer Test Start a 25 second timer (you are slower than a professional) and skim your resume. Circle all the...